Enterovirus D68: 11 U.S. states confirm total of 104 cases of common virus

Enterovirus outbreak map United States 2014

 

“Enteroviruses are very common, especially in the early fall. The CDC estimates that 10 million to 15 million infections occur in the United States each year. These viruses usually present like the common cold; symptoms include sneezing, a runny nose and a cough.

Most people recover without any treatment. But this type of enterovirus — Enterovirus D68 — appears to be exacerbating breathing problems in children who have asthma.

Since mid-August, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has confirmed 104 cases of Enterovirus D68 in 10 states: Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri and New York. Another state, Montana, also has one confirmed case, a spokesman for the state’s public health department tells CNN.” 

– CNN

Read more on CNN.

Read more:

  1. What parents should know about Enteroviruses
  2. CDC Reports
  3. Enterovirus 68 Wikipedia Entry

Enterovirus D68

Q: What is enterovirus D68?

A: Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) is one of many non-polio enteroviruses. This virus was first identified in California in 1962, but it has not been commonly reported in the United States.

Q: What are the symptoms of EV-D68 infection?

A: EV-D68 can cause mild to severe respiratory illness.

  • Mild symptoms may include fever, runny nose, sneezing, cough, and body and muscle aches.
  • Most of the children who got very ill with EV-D68 infection in Missouri and Illinois had difficulty breathing, and some had wheezing. Many of these children had asthma or a history of wheezing.

Q: How does the virus spread?

A: Since EV-D68 causes respiratory illness, the virus can be found in an infected person’s respiratory secretions, such as saliva, nasal mucus, or sputum. EV-D68 likely spreads from person to person when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or touches contaminated surfaces.

Read more on CDC website.

 

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